Sunday, September 12, 2010

Mohamed Ezoubeiri’s daily Show


Mohamed Ezoubeiri’s daily Show is a wonderful short that was filmed in his homeland of Morocco. Comprised of 3 parts - “Hands”, “Bread” and “ Urban Trailer”. The Daily Show is a very sobering look at what every day life is like for some in societies in our world today. The film successfully highlights seemingly mundane everyday events and gives them a sense of importance that one might otherwise overlook.
The first segment “Hands” is a very simple yet eloquent presentation of people using their hands to perform daily duties. Whether serving food, pouring tea or for decorating with Henna (a Middle Eastern form of make up), the hands in this clip are the leading characters that each get to express themselves in a different way.

The second segment “Bread” also manages to make a very impacting statement about the process of creation. The clip focuses on the rigorous process that goes into making a piece of bread, almost serving as a metaphor on life. The message is clearly that if one is in need of sustenance, then you must be prepared to work hard for it.
“Urban Trailer” is the third and final segment of the daily show. What might seem like a random collection of video clips is really a gaze into the different stories of the characters involved. The trash being blown in the wind; the man with the horse and carriage; the turtle; the two children running with the dog, these are all different characters that comprise urban trailers. This film makes one wonder, where are they coming from? Where are they going, and what are they thinking?
All in all, the Daily Show is a great piece of work. The stylistic preference of Ezoubeiri’s work is very eerie and mysterious. Even though his topics may not in themselves seem to posses such qualities, Ezoubeirie forces one to wonder about their “dark side”. While we take day to day life for granted, there is usually a deeper context in which these events can be viewed. Thankfully we have artists like Ezoubeiri who are willing to highlight them for us and make them easier to observe.

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